New Orleans Featured Attractions

Acadian Village This restored bayou town depicts the early 19th-century lifestyle of Acadians in southern Louisiana. Buildings relocated to the site include a general store, barn, chapel and several homes.

Aquarium of the Americas on the Mississippi River is a two-story structure housing more than 10,000 specimens representing some 530 species of marine life found throughout the Americas. Visitors can see sharks, stingrays, red-bellied piranhas, white alligators. Black-footed penguins and endangered sea turtles.

Audubon Park In 1884-85 the area was the scene of the World’s Industrial and Cotton Exposition, which startled the world with electric lighting indoors and out. The park has tree-shaded lagoons, gardens, bridle paths and golf course.

City Park covers 1,200 acres and is the fifth largest municipal park in the country. Many an affair of honor was settled beneath the Dueling Oaks. The park contains the New Orleans Botanical Garden, two miniature trains and a fairy tale theme park featuring 26 larger-than-life story book exhibits.

Destrehan Plantation is one of the oldest plantation homes in the lower Mississippi Valley. The central portion of the house was built 1787-90, and the wings, or garconnieres, were added about 1812. The Destrehan family entertained many noted guests, including the Duc d’Orleans, who later became the King of France. The notorious pirate Jean Lafitte’s frequent visits to the house gave rise to stories of hidden treasure in the walls.

The French Quarter formed the original settlement of New Orleans. In many ways the French Quarter remains the true heart of the city, not only because of its historical nature, but also because it is still very much alive. People from all walks of life live in the historical area and guard its iron-embroidered architectural treasures with fierce pride, enjoying the Quarter’s endless variety with as much gusto as first-time tourist. Typical of the contradictions of the Quarter is that is Spanish, not French. Disastrous fires in 1788 and 1794 destroyed most of the original French structures. Street names have changed for French to Spanish to mainly French again; the gold and blue signs of the corner buildings indicate the street names that prevailed under earlier regime.

Jean Lafitte Swamp Boat Tour with a Cajun guide to share the legends and lore of Southern Louisiana’s untamed wilderness. See alligators, snakes, egrets, white-tailed deer, mink and nutria in the wild.

Konrico Rice Mill began operating in 1912 and is said to be the nation’s oldest rice mill still in operation. A 20-minute slide show about the history of the mill and the region precedes the guided tour.

Lafayette When expelled from Nova Scotia by the British in the 1700s, the French Acadian farmers settled around Lafayette, a region of 22 parishes that would come to be known as Acadiana. Their descendants, commonly called Cajuns, still speak a French dialect and observe the traditions of their ancestors. Like gumbo, the staple of Cajun cuisine, Acadiana has become a melting pot of cultures. French is still the dominant influence, with traces of Spanish, African, American Indian, German and English.

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway is the world’s longest over water highway bridge. Crossing 24 miles of open water, the drive takes passengers out of sight of land for 8 miles. The bridge supports a four-lane divided highway with pullover areas for sightseeing.

Longue Vue House and Gardens This Greek revival mansion was the home of philanthropist Edgar Bloom Stern. The mansion is furnished with 18th- and 19th- century American and English antiques and surrounded by 8-acres of landscaped gardens and fountains.

Louisiana Superdome is a multi-purpose center designed to accommodate sporting events, trade shows, concerts and conventions. As tall as a 27-story building, the Superdome can seat 76,000 for some sporting events and 87,500 for concerts.

McIlhenny Company has manufactured Tabasco brand pepper sauce since 1868. A special variety of red capsicum pepper is cultivated annually to control the quality of the seed taken to Central and South America for planting.

Old Cemeteries scattered throughout the city, were originally built above ground because of the moist soil. Water would fill the graves even before the coffins were lowered. The tombs, 100 or more feet long and four tiers high, are of solid masonry. Most burials are still above ground because of custom rather than necessity.

St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square, is one of the oldest and most photographed churches in the country 154-foor-high pedestal, it is the tallest statue of modern times.

Six Flags New Orleans has over 100 rides, shows and attractions including Batman the Ride, the Jester (with 3 inversions), the Mega Zeph and Zydeco Scream.