Tag Archives: student travel

Washington, DC Illuminated Tour

A trip with your students to the Washington DC area is an adventure they will never forget. The best part of our Washington DC tour is when the sun sets and the entire city is quiet. The illuminated tour of the memorials and monuments makes the rich history of Washington DC seem more personal. The tour starts with the tribute to the soldiers of the Vietnam War. The Memorial Wall is etched with 58,318 names.  There are 1,200 names that are listed as missing (MIA) from the War never to be heard from again. Another dedication to the Vietnam memorial is the bronze statue of The Three Servicemen which depicts the three troops mourning the deaths of their fellow comrades. The third memorial to the Vietnam War is the Women’s Memorial which shows three nurses aiding a fellow solider and the dedication in their service.

Just past the Vietnam Memorial is the Lincoln Memorial which honors the 16th President of the United States. President Lincoln laid the foundation towards ending  slavery in the Southern states plus restoring the economy and revamping our government. Walking up the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, reminds you of the famous speech “I Have a Dream” given by the courageous and fearless leader of the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr. one hundred years later. Overlooking the Lincoln Memorial is the Reflecting Pool which has been filmed in several movies where you can relive the scene from the movie “Forest Gump” when Jenny runs in the reflecting pool towards Forest or from “Planet of the Apes” when Captain Leo lands his plane in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

From the Lincoln Memorial, you will then find yourself surrounded by the statues of troops from the Korean War depicting the war when North Korea invaded South Korea with the United States came to the aid of South Korea. Sounds eerily familiar to current events. Doesn’t it? The 19 stainless steel statues depict all the branches of the United States military forces which include the Army, Marines, Navy and Air Force. The mural wall adjacent to the statues, is made from granite and portrays the photographs that were captured during the Korean War.

The next stop on the tour is the memorial dedicated to Martin Luther King Jr. who was the leader of the Civil Rights movement. He was the voice for the African American community which endured racial discrimination and segregation.  Mr. King based his principles of non-violent resistance from Gandhi who was known for his idea of winning “hate with love”.  Mr. King continued the work of equality which was started by Abraham Lincoln in giving his famous  speech “I Have a Dream” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on October 16, 1963. The Stone of Hope at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial is a portrait of Mr. King carved into a granite statue. Surrounding his statue, is fourteen quotes from either King’s speeches, sermons or writings. Reading each quote displayed on the wall, you can feel the pain and hardship for equal rights during that time period which is  still ongoing today.

After the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, you continue on to the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial in honor of our 32nd President. Roosevelt was rated as one of the top US presidents of all time as he guided the government during the Great Depression. He also aided Britain and China against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941, he then declared war on Japan and Nazi Germany. He united our country in this dark era.  He spearheaded the Social Security Act which provided monetary security for the elderly still in existence today. The Roosevelt Memorial consists of a variety of sculptures to depict his life. There is a statue of Roosevelt along with his dog “Fala”,  and another of the first lady Mrs. Roosevelt,  honoring her dedication to the United Nations, and another statue of people standing in line for bread to portray the Great Depression. The designers of the Roosevelt Memorial made sure it was accessible to the disabled as President Roosevelt lost his legs due to polio during his childhood.

Then it’s a short drive to the next memorial which honors the fallen soldiers of World War II. The World War II Memorial is located between the Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument.  The Memorial is a tribute to the over 400,000 American soldiers who sacrificed their lives during this War. At the center of the memorial is an oval shaped fountain surrounded by 56 pillars representing, at that time, the nation’s 48 states, 7 federal territories and the District of Columbia. The northern entrance arch is engraved with “Atlantic” symbolizing the war against Nazi Germany while the southern entrance arch is engraves with “Pacific” symbolling the war against Japan. The Freedom Wall embellishes 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war.

The tallest monument in the district is the  Washington Monument which honors our 1st President of the United States, George Washington. Before becoming President, Washington’s leadership secured American independence during the Revolution against Great Britain. His great leadership skills is the reason why he was so popular and elected president. President Washington helped forge the foundation of our nation.  He was  actively involved with the setup of our federal government that is in use more than 230 years later.  Things such as the cabinet system, the inaugural address,  plus the term Mr. President. He was also the first to sign the Constitution in 1789. George Washington will always be known as the “father of our country” as he helped the pathway for our country to follow.

The illuminated tour will open up your students eyes and bring history alive to them!

Educational Student Trip to New York City

 

The very first question that the amazing tour directors at Educational Travel Consultants are asked when they arrive in New York City is, why did New York City decide to name one of its major cities after the state? Well, our guides always have the answer. In 1664, New York was named by the British in honor if the Duke of York and Albany.  He was the brother of the famous King Charles II. After New Amsterdam was taken away from the Dutch, New York City became the name of this major city. One of the most popular areas in New York City is Times Square. There is always time allotted for our groups to discover Times Square in all of Educational Travel Consultants itineraries, for groups that want it. With the flashy billboards and neon lights, there is no better place to be. Educational Travel Consultants also offers a guided tour of the city, and of course, a chance to experience Ellis Island and Liberty Island. Along with these amazing attractions, the group gets to experience a world renowned Broadway Musical! We are happy to customize a trip to your specific needs and wants. Educational Travel Consultants will provide  your students an  experience of a lifetime. We know that that a majority of your children  will only experience this exciting adventure once in their lives! Educational Travel Consultants is here to make your trip plans reality.

Mid-West College Tour Part 1

By 10th or 11th grade, students preparing for college need to be thinking about what school they will attend.  But it’s difficult to get a good read on a college by looking at a website or a brochure.  For this reason, I have designed college tours divided into geographic sections of the United States. Taking this type of tour allows college prep students to experience the university in person. The student group sees the campus and has the opportunity to speak to students, faculty and staff.

This type of interaction is valuable. It effectively inspires students to make a decision about their college of choice.

Following, I will offer an example of a Mid West College Tour (part 1) where students have the opportunity to visit some of the most distinguished universities in this area of the United States.  This is by no means a comprehensive list of Mid West colleges. I encourage teachers taking students on this type of tour to add or delete colleges they really wish to visit.  In fact, there are so many great schools in the Mid West, there will be a part 2 to this article.

University of Cincinnati

Serving over 40,000 students and delivering 308 programs of study, University of Cincinnati is a well-respected urban university.  Forbes magazine ranked it among the most beautiful campuses in the United States.  The campus is a showcase for contemporary architecture.  Known for its accredited Musical Theater Program and its Architecture, Construction & Building Trades Program, UC has a great deal to offer the imaginative student.  UC has a 15/1 student-faculty teaching ratio and over 250 Graduate Programs to choose from.

Xavier University

Also located in Cincinnati, Ohio, Xavier University enrolls approximately 6,700 students each year.  There is a College of Arts and Sciences, Social Sciences, Health & Education, and the Williams College of Business, so students studying in these areas will be most interested in Xavier.  The Musketeers Men’s basketball team, women’s soccer and basketball teams, and other athletic and co-curricular activities make Xavier an exciting campus.

Ohio State University

With an enrollment of nearly 65,000 students, 1,700 acres of land and 457 buildings, Ohio State University has a huge impact on Columbus, Ohio.  Cited among the top 20 national public universities by U.S. News and World Report in 2010, Ohio State University is a top-rated school.  Academic programs range from Medicine to Engineering, Architecture, Arts and Sciences and more. The campus is a mixture of Gothic revival architecture and contemporary building designs, with a 60-acre arboretum and abundant gardens and plazas.

Indiana University

Indiana University (IU) has eight campuses across the state. The main campus is in Bloomington and is scheduled as a stop for this tour.  Indiana University was founded in 1820 and has a rich heritage. The campus retains its historical beginnings in its layout and architecture with Indiana limestone buildings dating to the late 19th Century. Bloomington is a town of about 70,000 people. The inhabitants of Bloomington and the campus community refer to it as “B-town” because of its lively music scene, coffeehouses, farmers markets, international cuisine, and festivals.  IU is known academically for its business, arts, law, technology and journalism programs to name just a few highlights.  With over 32,000 students and a diverse student body, Indiana University is a premiere institution.

Purdue University

Ranked among U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges, Purdue is an outstanding University. The main campus is located in West Lafayette Indiana, and is the scheduled destination for this tour. There are also Purdue locations in Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Westville and Hammond.  Ranked #1 in Biological and Agricultural Programs, and in the top 10 for Undergraduate Business and Engineering students, Purdue has distinguished programs to offer the student of Science, Technology Engineering and Math.  Purdue is also well known in many areas of research in these fields.  With over 30,000 undergraduate students enrolled and a competitive selection process, Purdue University is certainly a school worth serious consideration.

University of Illinois

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign is a school that has educated numerous Pulitzer Prize and Nobel winners.  Undergraduate enrollment is over 31,000 students, and there are 17 different colleges and Instructional units to choose from. University of Illinois was established in 1867 and retains a 19th Century flavor in some of its architecture.   Known for the liberal arts and sciences, University of Illinois has a distinguished list of alumnus – scientists and writers recognized for excellence in their field.  The campus tour includes visits to a number of buildings that date to the 19th and early 20th Centuries.

Take student groups on a college tour of selected schools in the Mid West to help them gain a realistic perspective of college life.  In addition to visiting schools, entertainment and dining are part of the itinerary. Students can spend time exploring towns such as Bloomington, West Lafayette and Cincinnati to get a feel for lifestyles, cuisine, geography, climate and more.

Request a Quote or email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com.

School Choir Teacher Takes Students on Trip to NYC and Washington D.C.

Performance tours are designed for student musicians and choirs to bring their music and song to new audiences.  These tours include visits to major student travel destinations such as Washington D.C., New York City or Orlando with fun, interesting and historical sites on the itinerary.  In addition to touring, there is a pre-booked performance date at a well-known location, such as the Statue of Liberty or Washington Cathedral.

I recently interviewed a teacher from Hawaii, Cora Palafox Aczon, who has traveled with her school choir for 13 years. Aczon began traveling since 1998 with her student choir to perform in different places like California, New York, Washington, D.C., and even in Vancouver.  Aczon says, “I started organizing these tours for choir purposes.  It is an opportunity to showcase the God-given talents of the students, and also to appreciate other parts of the world.”

Aczon has been a teacher for 16 years at Saint Anthony School (Honolulu), a private Catholic educational institution. As part of its religious mission, the school serves its own community in a variety of ways.  The choir sings at St. Anthony Parish on Sundays, First Fridays, Family Masses, and special days.  They also bring their music to the malls, community gatherings, and other places.  So it made perfect sense to me that the group leader would be interested in engaging students in community service while traveling in other cities.

There is always community work to be done, no matter where the student choir is traveling. Since service is part of the agenda for Aczon’s school trips, I take some time to research retirement communities, churches, and non-profit organizations in the area where her group is touring, to find organizations that serve the elderly, sick or disadvantaged populations. During the trip planning process, I run a few ideas past Cora Aczon to get a feel for what type of site works best for her group. The choir’s performance is always a welcome special event, no matter where they may be booked. Sometimes the choir’s performance location is determined by the travel dates and scheduled openings at host organizations.  If the group leader plans far enough in advance, he or she may have a choice of different locations

It is a long trip to the mainland United States from Hawaii.  The most recent trip Saint Anthony’s School Choir made was to New York City and Washington D.C. Aczon told me, “Some of the students and parents have never been to the mainland U.S.  Most of the students and parents have not gone to the East Coast yet.  They have read a great deal about these places in books, and have seen these places in movies.  The group wanted to have the feel and experience of being there, even just for a short time.” A performance tour is a wonderful way to explore the cities students study in history class. The performance allows students to take time to interact with the community, and get to know people there in a more intimate way.

On their visit to New York City, the Saint Anthony School Choir visited many popular destinations such as the United Nations, NBC Studios, the Empire State Building and Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum. They also toured Manhattan, dined at Planet  Hollywood and saw the Broadway musical, “Mary Poppins.”  The choir was scheduled to sing at the Statue of Liberty, but the entire group was a bit disappointed when their outdoor performance was rained out. Nevertheless, their visit to NYC was a memorable one and there were many positive experiences on their journey.

The Saint Anthony School Choir’s visit to Washington D.C. and performance there went as planned.  In D.C., the choir visited Arlington National Cemetery, Smithsonian American and Natural History Museums, the Supreme Court, the U.S. Capitol, Mount Vernon, and the Holocaust Museum.  The group even attended mass, and sang at St. Peter’s Catholic Church in Capitol Hill.  They also performed at the Air & Seaman’s Home – where they were very well received.  Aczon recalled, “The choir’s performance was emotionally moving.  Some of the residents said they were at Pearl Harbor on December 7th and seeing and hearing the kids from Hawaii brought back memories of World War II.”  When student performance groups make a connection to people at the place they perform, they begin to understand that singing and community service does have an impact.

Student tours should provide active learning opportunities.  There must always be time for recreation and fun as well. I feel that performance tours with community service on the itinerary also open up the possibility of getting to know something about contemporary life and the people who live in large urban areas.  With community service as a component to a performance tour, students are able to hear and see the results of their work.  People in the community also have the chance to learn more about the lifestyles of the places where students originate. This exchange enriches all involved.

For more information about booking a performance tour or band trip, visit http://www.educationaltravelconsultants.com or email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com to request a quote.

Class Trips to Southeastern Virginia to Study Science

Many student trips to Virginia focus on early American history and the study of the Civil War. With sites like Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown Island, Yorktown Battlefields, Arlington National Cemetery, Monticello, and the historic homes of numerous presidents, it is no surprise many school trips to the Commonwealth focus on history. Yet a school trip to Virginia is also a great choice for the study of science.

In previous articles I have written about science destinations in Northern Virginia and Washington D.C. and an Eco Tour of Virginia.  This article will focus specifically on destinations in Southeastern Virginia in Norfolk, Hampton, and Virginia Beach.  Destinations on the science tour of Virginia can be combined with a student trip to Washington D.C. or Williamsburg or taken as a stand-alone educational tour of Virginia.

Nauticus, The National Maritime Center
Nauticus is located on the harbor in Norfolk, Virginia. The Museum is a 45-minute bus ride from Williamsburg and is well worth the trip.  Nauticus is home to battleship Wisconsin, the last battleship built by the U.S. Navy.  Students learn about the way science impacts Naval history and economics and methods and instruments used in navigating the sea.  School groups tour the battleship Wisconsin and the nearby museum. Afterwards, groups can have lunch at Waterside, and explore downtown Norfolk.

Mariners’ Museum
The Mariner’s Museum is located in Newport News, Virginia, and encompasses 60,000 square feet of exhibition space. Students can learn about maritime history and view artifacts from the Monitor battleship and exhibitions on topics such as the Chesapeake Bay watermen. Groups touring the museum will see handmade ship models, paintings, and photographs related to the history of work on the sea from world class collections. If the weather is nice, school groups can take a walk around Mariners’ Museum Park and Noland Trail, a naturally wooded setting surrounding Lake Maury.

Virginia Air and Space Center
The Virginia Air and Space Center is not far from NASA Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Virginia, where America’s space exploration program first began in earnest.  The museum exhibits document over 100 years in aviation and provide visitors with an overview of space exploration that includes artifacts from space flights.  The Virginia Air and Space center houses over 30 planes. With its high tech interactive exhibits and an Imax theater on site, it is sure to be a popular destination for student groups.

Hampton Roads Harbor Cruise
One way for students to see and learn about life in the Chesapeake Bay region is to climb aboard a boat that gives students a view of the harbor.  Harbor cruises leave from either the port of Norfolk or Hampton, Virginia.  Each cruise includes slightly different views and points of interest.  Students will see the awe inspiring Norfolk Naval base, where aircraft carriers, submarines and other support vessels are docked. Groups will learn about other points of interest in the harbor that date to the time of the first English settlers and the Civil War.  The harbor cruise takes approximately two hours and offers a perspective that is stimulating and different from a walking tour.

Lifesaving Museum of Virginia
Student groups can take a trip to Virginia Beach, Virginia to explore the Lifesaving Museum of Virginia.  Here they will see the remains of shipwrecks, and learn about lifesaving and techniques and equipment used to rescue people from the sea.  Groups may elect to take a guided School of the Surfman tour that includes an overview of skills honed by rescuers and their stories.

The Southeastern corner of Virginia, also known as Tidewater Virginia, is the perfect place for students to engage in active learning about scientific topics.  It is rich in maritime history and the innovations of space exploration. The Tidewater area of Virginia is also home to the largest Naval base on the East Coast and several U.S. Coast Guard stations.  Depending upon curricular objectives, student tour leaders may also elect to add other destinations to the science tour such as a visit to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, the Virginia Marine Science Museum, the Virginia Living Museum, or the Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center.

Request a Quote for a student trip or email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com.

Preparation Tips for Class Trips

When student travel groups embark on a class trip to a destination far from home, it can seem like a daunting endeavor. Over the last 25 years of planning class trips to a variety of U.S. destination, I have found that pre-trip planning and organization can be key to a smooth trip.

Student groups need to be given clear instructions in planning for a class trip. These student tour groups will manage their departure from home and arrival in another city much better than those who do not receive directions.

Class Trip Suggestions

I am going to detail some basic preparation tips for class trips that assist in creating a tour that proceeds on schedule and allows student travelers, chaperones and teachers to relax and derive maximum enjoyment from the journey.

1. Luggage rules for airline carriers have changed over the past two years. To avoid extra baggage fees students are best advised to limit their luggage to one suitcase and a small carry on.

2. Students should bring a minimum amount of cash with them. My educational travel company recommends $50 total. If students require more than this on tour, then credit cards, bank cards, or travelers checks are a wise alternative.

3. While taking a student tour of the destination city, we strongly advise that students stay in groups of four or more and with their assigned chaperone.

4. Eating and drinking is allowed on most buses. Should the bus driver decided to discontinue this privilege, then the student travel group must honor this request. Encourage all members of the student tour group to keep the buses clean.

5. These days, many students have their own cell phones. For those who do not, hotel phone numbers are listed on the itineraries. Parents should retain a copy of the itinerary so they may reach their children easily.

6. While staying in hotels, long distance phone calls and pay television are turned off. The group sponsor may elect to allow students to pay for movies at the front desk, but the student must be accompanied by an adult. Local phone calls made from the room are paid for by that room’s occupants.

7. Hotel rules need to be made and ultimately enforced by teachers. This includes curfews (which are usually set at 11 p.m.), room assignments, and room-to-room calling.

8. If a security person is retained for this class trip, then this person will meet the group sponsor to be apprised of the rules and implementation.

9. If problems occur on the class trip and a tour escort is unable to solve them, the educational travel company should be contacted directly.

My educational travel company provides a list of preparation tips for class trips prior to departure. I recommend teachers copy this list and give the written tips to the students that are traveling.

If students and parents are made aware of these class trip suggestions, the majority will follow these requests. Wherever their destination may be, we feel these guidelines help create a safe and enjoyable class trip.

Email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com for more information on class trips to a desired destination, or take five minutes to fill out our online form and Request a Quote today.

Educational Tours: Tips for Packing Light on Student Trips

These days, when student travel groups set out for any destination by air, it is both practical and economical to travel light. Many airlines have begun applying new lower minimum weight requirements that average 75 pounds per bag for transported baggage. If bags exceed this limit, additional fees may apply.

The trick for many student travel groups is to pack light when planning the initial trip and when making a return, avoid carrying an excessive amount of souvenirs. If heavier souvenirs are purchased, then the student or chaperone may want to consider shipping items instead of bringing these items on board the return flight.

The practice of carrying one bag only works especially well on 3-5 day student trips. Some airlines are even beginning to add extra charges for the first bag and additional bags; some only charge for extra luggage.

Encourage students to limit their possessions to one piece of luggage for the trip and a carry-on item such as a backpack, handbag, or laptop bag for items they may need easier access to on board.

Following are several other packing tips I would like to share with those taking student trips this year and next.

Select a good piece of luggage: Do NOT select a suitcase that’s overly large. Instead, opt for something medium sized that has wheels and a handle for easy transfer. A lightweight bag would be canvas or nylon. Leather bags are going to be heavy. If the class trip is three days or less, students may be able to get by with just a carry on bag and a bag to stow under the seat. Check with airlines for regulation sizes for carry on baggage to eliminate a potential luggage charge.

Tag Luggage: In the event that a piece of luggage could be lost, place a name and an address inside each checked-in and carry on bag. Make sure to carry at least one change of clothes and a toothbrush in the carry on bag.

Make lists: A packing list is always helpful. It can help the student traveler to focus on what is needed, instead of adding extra items that will not be used. Make sure only necessary items make it to the list.

Select Clothing Appropriate for Climate: When packing, be aware of the climate or potential weather conditions at the destination. Pack essential clothing (and coats) accordingly. Wear bulkier items such as coats on the plane, to save space and weight in luggage. Roll underwear and place inside shoes to save space.

Limit shoes to two pair:
One pair of shoes is worn on the plane. Pack another pairs of shoes and that’s all. Make sure both pairs of shoes are comfortable walking shoes.

Pack Trial Size Body Care Items: Try to shop ahead and obtain trial size toothpaste, mouthwash, soap, shampoo and hair care items. This saves space in baggage and makes bags lighter. Put all liquids in zip lock bags and take an extra zip lock bag for a wet bathing suit or towel.

Prescription Drugs: Prescription drugs, especially diabetes medications with syringes, should be in pharmacy prescription bottles.

Eyeglasses or Contact Lenses: Make sure to bring protective eyeglass cases, as well as spray and cloth for care. Bring just enough disposable contacts (with maybe one extra) for short trips to save space, or smaller amounts of contact lens cleaner to save space and weight in baggage.

These packing tips are designed for the student traveler who may be new to the idea of traveling afar. Yet these advance planning ideas for trips are essential for saving money and making transfer of baggage easier.

In the interest of economy, security, and ease of travel remember to go light on class trips. For information on booking class trips email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com or Request a Quote via the online form.

Underground Railroad Tour Near Gettysburg is Active Learning About Black History

Just outside of Gettysburg National Battlefields in Pennsylvania, are historic sites that served as stations for the “Underground Railroad.” The “Underground Railroad” is a part of our nation’s history that is still shrouded in mystery. The mythical “underground railroad” was a series of safe houses that sheltered slaves who were running from their southern homes, northward, to freedom.

Just on the other side of the Mason Dixon line from Maryland, is Adams County, Pennsylvania, which was at one time a Quaker stronghold and a place where the Underground Railroad was active. William and Phebe Wright were two Quakers in the area who figured prominently in the Underground Railroad activities. They worked closely with sympathetic people in and near the town of Biglersville to help slaves find their way to freedom.

Student travel groups interested in exploring black history, the Civil War period, and the way in which in slavery has affected the fabric of the United States, will benefit from the Underground Railroad Tour of Adams County near Gettysburg. This tour works well with a student group travel tour of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, or New York City, because Gettysburg is just a two to three hour bus ride from these student travel destinations.

Here are some of the highlights of the Underground Railroad Tour:

Yellow Hill (church and cemetery)
Yellow Hill was a central location for the Underground Railroad. Nearby resident Basil Biggs guided many fugitive slaves there. At Yellow Hill, slaves were given refuge until other residents and Quakers in the town hid and cared for them, protecting them from harm. Yellow Hill Church was burned at one time as a racist act. The Yellow Hill Cemetery contains the remains of many who lost their lives due to the tense circumstances of their time.

Quaker Meetinghouse (1880s)
The Quaker faith proclaims an aversion to violence and a peaceful resistance to oppression. The Quaker Meetinghouse in Adams County served as a place to publicly voice opinion about the Abolitionist movement, and to organize effective acts against it. Throughout U.S. history Quakers have always been conscientious objectors to war. Student travel groups will learn about the Quaker perspective on Civil Rights and violence while touring the Underground Railroad and how their viewpoint directly impacted the Abolitionist movement.

U.S. Colored Troops
Adams County was a central location between North and South, and Yellow Hill Cemetery is a historic site where many mysteries of that era are buried. Many students are unaware that U.S. Colored Troops who served in the Civil War are buried at Yellow Hill as well. This site serves as a reminder to student group travelers that there were indeed many casualties of racism in the United States and they date to the earliest periods in this country’s history.

Mathews Family
The Mathews, an African American family who lived near Yellow Hill during the Civil War era, were destined to be involved in the secretive Underground Railroad. Student tour groups will listen to stories about many of the local families, including the Mathews, who helped over 1,000 slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad in this area of Pennsylvania.

The Underground Railroad Tour of Adams County is perhaps one of the best active learning tools available to teach students about Black History. In addition to reading about the Underground Railroad, students may visit the historic sites and learn the stories about real people who helped operate the Underground Railroad. This adds a tangible element to learning about African American history and instills in students a real sense of the diversity inherent in our nation’s beginnings.
To request a quote combining the Underground Railroad Tour of Adams County with a student travel tour of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, or New York City, visit Request a Quote and fill out the form for group travel.

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