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Learn the Importance of Science and Math: Plan a Student Trip to Boston, MA

When it comes to science and math, student trips offer some of the most memorable and insightful experiences of a young person’s academic life. Boston, MA has long been considered one of the brightest spots for educational tours, as it offers customizable class trips to exciting destinations such as: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), The Boston Science Museum & the New England Aquarium. All of these venues showcase eye-opening exhibits highlighting: engineering, chemistry, space exploration, technology, medicine and much more.

Student Trips to MIT Celebrate the History of Science

MIT is home to some of the most innovative and profound breakthroughs in math and science in the world. If you’re planning a student trip, be sure to visit the Edgerton Center Corridor Lab (http://web.mit.edu/Edgerton/www/CorridorLab.html). This lab is filled with interactive displays that give students a hands-on demonstration of various scientific and engineering properties. The MIT Museum (http://web.mit.edu/museum/) has its share of wonders as well including Kismet, the world’s first sociable robot. Whether it’s holographic, oceanic or architectural, students are bound to find something that’s truly captivating.

The List Visual Arts Center is also located on MIT campus. Here students can explore the creative arts, science and mathematics, especially in the mixed-media art gallery. There are over 1,500 permanent pieces on display, and the center also frequently hosts temporary exhibitions by world-class artists such as Pablo Picasso and Michael Heizer.

Have a Hands-On Class Trip at the Boston Science Museum

The Boston Science Museum is a perfect destination for an upcoming math field trip, as space exploration is one of its most extensive exhibits. The museum includes over 700 permanent exhibits, as well as countless temporary exhibits and shows. For students of astronomy, the museum offers a planetarium with shows scheduled throughout the day. For students craving more visual stimulus, the museum also includes a high-end laser show, an HD 3D theatre that requires no glasses to witness, and an IMAX theatre. All in all, the museum offers an in-depth, exciting look into life sciences, earth and space sciences, math, physics and nanotechnology. And best of all, group rates are available for student trips.

Discover the Seas at the New England Aquarium

The New England Aquarium is a must-stop venue for any class trip. The aquarium sees over 1.5 million visitors per year, and they have experts standing by for customized educational tours (http://www.neaq.org/education_and_activities/index.php). With over 20,000 animals on site, student tours will get an intimate look at African penguins, Atlantic Harbor seals, sea dragons, and even a giant Pacific octopus.

One of the aquarium’s greatest draws is the 200,000-gallon salt-water tank. It stands over four stories tall and gives guests the opportunity to see a Caribbean ecosystem first-hand. The tank has over 600 species inside and can be viewed from all angles, including a view straight down into the coral reef from above.

For student groups interested in a Whale Watch, schedule a time to take the Voyager II, a high-speed catamaran that takes groups 30 miles off the coast of Boston to the whale feeding grounds. Voyager II leaves from the New England Aquarium dock. Whale watching is seasonal so check with an educational travel consultant to see if it is in sync with the student trip being planned.

Explore More on a Student Trip Boston

Boston has long been considered one of America’s brightest cities. Student trips can also include popular historic destinations in and around the city such as the Boston Commons, the Mayflower, Plymouth Rock, the Freedom Trail, Salem, Walden Pond, Faneuil Hall, the U.S.S. Constitution, Quincy Market and more. Its streets are lined with history, and its universities are admired throughout the world. An educational science tour through the halls of MIT will undoubtedly make a lasting impression. And whether it’s the vast expanses of space at the Museum of Science or the brimming life in our oceans at the New England Aquarium, one cannot help but feel a rare sense of awe and wonder at the utter complexity and magnificence of planet Earth and all its inhabitants.

Boston, Massachusetts is Ideal for Student Trips

If you are looking for a great destination for a history or social studies tour, Boston is an ideal choice for an educational trip with students. Boston, MA is a city steeped in American history from the Puritans who founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 to the Boston Tea Party and the American Revolution to America’s first subway. Student tours in and around Boston are easily managed in what is known as the “Walking City.”

Boston is an indoor-outdoor museum of history and architecture. All educational trips to Boston should include at least a portion of the Freedom Trail. The Freedom Trail is 2.5 mile walking tour through Boston that winds its way around 16 significant historic sites from the USS Constitution to the Boston Commons. Guided tours are available for student groups but the Freedom Trail is well-marked and the Freedom Trail Foundation offers maps and other resources for educators at www.thefreedomtrail.org.

Educational Travel to Boston: Excursion to Lexington and Concord
Boston was one of the epicenters of the American Revolution. It was home to many famous patriots including Paul Revere, best remembered for his ride through the countryside warning the Minute Men that the British were marching toward Concord. Lexington and Concord, the sites of the first battles of the American Revolution, are just west of downtown Boston. Here history students can come face-to-face with the Daniel Chester French’s Minute Man statue and the Old North Bridge where the Massachusetts militia defeated the British shortly after the “shot heard ’round the world” was fired.

Adjacent to the Old North Bridge is the Old Manse, the ancestral home of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Nathaniel Hawthorne lived and wrote in the Old Manse for three years and Henry David Thoreau tilled a garden there for Hawthorne and his wife. Not far away, students can visit Walden Pond where Thoreau lived and wrote in semi seclusion for two years. History, social studies, and American literature almost come to life for students in Concord and Lexington, Massachusetts.

Student Trips to Boston Should Include Salem
A short jaunt north along the coast takes student groups to Salem, a town associated with one of the darkest and most fascinating episodes in American History: the Salem Witch Trials. The Salem Witch Museum takes student visitors back to Salem in 1692. The museum offers a dramatic history lesson through the use of stage sets, life-size figures, and a narrated overview of the Witch Trials. The museum also has an exhibit, Witches: Evolving Perceptions, examining the changing definitions of “witch” and “witchcraft,” stereotyping, witch hunts, and even the modern practice of Wicca. This exhibit also includes contemporary examples of witch hunts based on the “fear + trigger = scapegoat” formula, bringing the past into a present day perspective for students.

A Salem, Massachusetts building that will inspire students’ imaginations is the House of the Seven Gables, complete with a hidden staircase. Author Nathaniel Hawthorne, a descendent of Witch Trial judge, John Hawthorne, spent time in this house owned by his cousins, the Ingersols, when he was a child. Stories he heard about it merged with his family’s history in his dark romantic novel of the same name as the house. Hawthorne’s birthplace is now located on the grounds of the House of the Seven Gables as well.

Include Plymouth in Student Trips to Boston
A field trip to Boston, Massachusetts wouldn’t be complete without an excursion south along the coast to Plymouth. Here students can see Plymouth Rock where the Pilgrims first landed in 1620, visit the Mayflower II, and visit the living history museum, Plimoth Plantation. The plantation is located at the site of the first colony in New England. It recreates life in a Wampanoag village and a 1627 English settlement bringing two worlds together and to life making a great experience for students studying Native American and Colonial history. Teachers can find a variety of resources and curriculum guides for Plimoth Plantation on the museum’s Web site, www.plimoth.org.


Educational Trips to Boston are Enriching Experiences

Educational travel to Boston, Mass. can include many other points of interest like the New England Aquarium and the Museum of Science. Student trips to Boston can also feature whale watching trips or even a Boston Red Sox game. Contact an experienced educational travel consultant to help you plan the best trip for your student group.

Student Trips to Boston May Request a Revolutionary War Tour Theme

by Howard Clemens

For students reading about the Revolutionary War in social studies or history classes, Boston, Massachusetts is a great choice as a destination for active learning. Visits to select destinations bring the early days of the Revolutionary War alive for student travel groups. Student trips headed for Boston, Mass. will learn about the Revolutionary War from multiple perspectives, with some sites offering living history programs.

Leading men who fought for freedom from England during the time period include: John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Paul Revere. These are just a few of the well-known figures of the Revolutionary War who come alive on a student tour. Countless farmers and families who mustered as Minute Men and defended their properties while under attack by British troops supported these leading figures.

Boston Massacre
The Boston Massacre occurred in 1770 in downtown Boston, just outside the Old State House at the corner of Devonshire and State Streets. British soldiers had occupied Boston for nearly two years and tension between the colonists and soldiers reached a peak. An agitated crowd began to complain loudly to soldiers and one of the British fired into the crowd, killing five people that day. This event was widely publicized and well documented. John Adams, a lawyer then, defended Captain Preston and six of his troops were acquitted, while two men were found guilty of manslaughter and discharged from the army. The first patriot to die was a freed slave who worked on whale ships: Crispus Attucks.

John Adams: Roles in Revolutionary War History
John Adams was at one time a lawyer, and he actually defended Captain Preston in the case of the Boston Massacre. Despite his beginnings, he became one of the most esteemed figures of the Revolutionary War period. Adams gifted his extensive collection of books to the town of Quincy, Massachusetts in 1822 at the age of 86. Today, parts of this collection are being digitized for easier public access. The collection as well as Adams’ papers is housed in the Boston Public Library Copley Square Rare Books and Manuscripts Department. Student trips may tour this part of the library to gain an understanding about the life of one of the influential figures in drafting and signing the Declaration of Independence. Adams was the first Vice President and the second President of the United States. He also served as a diplomat to Paris and Holland. Though he and his wife Abigail lived frugally on a public servant’s salary, Adams invested a huge sum in books, which is evident from visiting the library. Teachers and students may access special educational materials from the John Adam’s library at http://www.johnadamslibrary.org/explore/teachersandstudents/.

John Quincy Adams
The son of John Adams, John Quincy became a capable diplomat and linguist. Long before he became the 6th President, John Quincy Adams held many distinguished governmental roles, including Secretary of State for James Monroe, where he was instrumental in drafting the Monroe Doctrine. John Quincy can be studied in depth at the Adams National Historical Park. Student travel groups may tour the Visitor Center. With reservations, the student group may also take a Ranger guided tour of the Old House and the Presidential birthplaces. Historical narratives by costumed interpreters John and Abigail Adams and Thomas Jefferson are also presented in season. Check with your student travel agency to see if there will be any living history performances while a student group is on tour.

Lexington and Concord
On any student trip to Boston to study the Revolutionary War, a trip to the Minute Man National Historical Park, which spans the Lexington and Concord battlefields, is a must. Here is where the first battle of the Revolutionary War was fought by the Minute Men or troops from the New England countryside. For groups with time, a 3 ? hour battle road trail walk gives the entire perspective of the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Student groups may also visit the Minute Man Visitor Center and watch the film and visit the exhibits. At Hartwell Tavern, Rangers demonstrate firing muskets from an authentic early American rifle. Or, students may want to add a visit to The Wayside, where Nathaniel Hawthorne and Louisa May Alcott both wrote. The Lexington and Concord Museum ranger programs and historical sites draw upon information from the Concord writers of the Revolutionary War period. Teachers who would like to prepare a curriculum for the student trip may visit http://www.nps.gov/mima/forteachers/index.htm.

Walking Tour of Boston
The Freedom Trail is a fun, healthy way to see Boston through the lens of the Revolutionary War period. This walk may take several hours so students are encouraged to dress accordingly, wear comfortable shoes and bring some drinking water. The Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common and includes Beacon Hill, The Union Oyster House (for lunch) and a visit to Paul Revere’s home, a two-story clapboard house across from North Square. Groups also stop at Old North Church, where the first bells of the British Colonies were rung in North America. The Freedom Trail ends with the USS Constitution and the Bunker Hill Monument. The USS Constitution has been nicknamed “Old Ironsides” as a result of engagements with the British in the War of 1812. Student groups love to take The Freedom Trail tour because it is mostly outdoors and a wonderful way for a group to see Boston in the spring or fall.

Educational travel can be a great way to get students excited about periods in American history. Boston is a city where student travelers can experience Early American architecture, artifacts, politics and art and it should not be overlooked as a worthwhile student travel destination. Email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com for information about a student tour of Boston or Request a Quote.