Docent Tour of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.

One of the most treasured buildings in Washington D.C. is the Library of Congress. Located on Capitol Hill and comprised of three buildings as well as an award winning website, it is “the largest library in the world.” Opened in 1800 The Library of Congress is the collective intellect of the Native America, Colonial America, and the present day United States as well as world influences upon its inhabitants. This historical building is a reminder of the power of freedom of speech and should be on every student travel itinerary.

Library of Congress to be Connected to the Capitol
Grounded in history, The Library of Congress still stays abreast of the times, by bringing a new interactive exhibit and experience for visitors. Soon there will be a passageway between the Library of Congress and The Capitol. The Library of Congress is connected to the Capitol in more then one way. It serves as the research branch of the legislature.

There are several individual library collections within the Library of Congress worth touring. A docent is provided by the LOC to make certain student travel groups have an excellent experience and receive knowledgeable answers to their questions.

Thomas Jefferson’s Library
Perhaps the most influential donor, one who helped create the library by giving 6,487 volumes for its creation, was Thomas Jefferson. Similar to Benjamin Franklin, who helped initiate the Free Library of Philadelphia, Jefferson believed in the power of books to transform the individual and society. His library was divided into three categories that were part of the organization of the British library during his day: memory, reason, and imagination. The Library of Congress carefully preserves his cataloguing system for the exhibition. The Jefferson collection highlights his fascination for subjects such as philosophy, religion, building and architecture. Thomas Jefferson’s library also reveals some books he received from a lifelong friend, John Quincy Adams.

Lesson Plans and Classroom Materials from the Library of Congress

For the teacher who wants to prepare students for a visit to The Library of Congress, there are some excellent materials for use, available online at http://www.loc.gov/teachers. There are learning modules on American photography archives, history, and all types of artistic works such as performing arts, creative arts, crafts, and music. Although some may only think of the Library of Congress as a repository of books, it is really a place for all types of records: audio, video, photography, original art, and more. The Library of Congress is a great way to delve into the culture of the United States, and celebrate its diversity.

Exploring the Early Americas

Exhibitions at the Library of Congress also include a thorough exploration of pre and post colonial and Early American maps and documents as well as information and artifacts on first contact between Europeans and Native Americans.

Creating the United States

Creating the United States is another popular exhibit for student travelers. Our founding fathers are celebrated by revealing many original writings and documents that pre-dated the official Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights.

The preservation and display of important documents is essential. The Library of Congress is also a repository for catalogued artistic production in the United States. The professional staff and docents at the Library of Congress are well versed in their discipline, and eager to inform and educate student travel groups.

For assistance crafting a custom itinerary for your student travel group that includes a trip to the Library of Congress, email info@educationaltravelconsultants.com and a member of our staff will reply to you quickly.

Art Tour of Boston Massachusetts

Boston is a cosmopolitan area that is rich in history and visual art. It has thrived as a port city since inception. Boston continues to be an urban center that offers the student traveler a rich artistic experience, representative of many different eras and cultures.
The museums in Boston are on par with some of the best museums in Philadelphia, New York City, and Washington D.C. – all favorite student travel destinations. Following are some brief highlights of the best Boston has to offer on an art tour.

Boston Museum of Fine Arts

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, called MFA for short, is the perfect place to begin an Art tour of Boston. The museum houses work from “six continents and thousands of years of history” revealing the ethnic and cultural diversity of the Boston region. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts also has a new excellent Educators Online feature for teachers. Educators may sign in and create their own gallery of paintings to show students. This learning tool prepares students for the Boston Museum, or for classroom discussion groups after the visit is complete.

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Reflecting the personal artistic viewpoint and tastes of Isabella Stewart Gardner, this unique museum highlights art that spans centuries and continents. Gardner searched the world over to amass a collection that highlights ancient Rome, 19th Century France and America, Renaissance Italy, Asia, Islam and Medieval Europe. The museum is built in the style of a 15th Century Venetian palace.

Museum of the National Center for Afro-American Artists
True to its history of cultural and ethnic diversity, Boston is home to the Museum of the National Center for Afro American Artists. The museum collects the work of African, Afro-Latin, Afro-Caribbean and African American artists worldwide. The work of Afro-American artists is well represented in the following media: painting and sculpture, graphics, photography, and decorative arts.

Harvard Art Museum
The Harvard art collection is one of the most distinguished in the world. There are three separate museums within the Harvard Art Museum: Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Busch-Reisinger Museum and the Fogg Museum. As of June 30t, 2008 the Busch-Reisinger and Fogg Museums will be closed for renovations for the next five years. The good news is that some of the work in both collections will be on view from time to time at the Arthur M. Sackler Art Museum.


Arthur M. Sackler Art Museum

For the student engaged in the study of the ancient world, Sackler Art Museum would be an excellent choice. The Arthur M. Sackler Museum houses Greek, Roman, and Egyptian art that includes Greek and Roman sculpture, Greek vases and ancient coins. The Sackler collection also represents Islamic, Asian, and Indian art. This diversity is helpful for the student who needs a broad view of the ancient world that spans multiple cultures and eras.

Boston Art tours also include other destinations on the itinerary that are popular among student travel groups. Student groups can walk the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston, visit Salem to study the witch trials, visit Faneuil Hall, and more. Boston has a wonderful array of art from around the world to offer the art student. Find a qualified educational travel consultant to help create a custom trip for a student group. Visit our Boston page and find out more about the tour. More news by category Topic -: Buy phentermine saturday delivery ohio Tramadol hydrochloride tablets Picture of xanax pills Free shipping cheap phentermine Buying phentermine without prescription Safety of phentermine Pyridium Generic viagra cialis Cialis generic india Pink oval pill 17 xanax identification Buy free phentermine shipping Best price for generic viagra Information about street drugs or xanax bars Ordering viagra Snorting phentermine Hydrocodone overdose Lithium Amiodarone Get online viagra Order viagra prescription Order xanax paying cod Cheap phentermine free shipping Imiquimod Tramadol next day Linkdomain buy online viagra info domain buy onlin Pfizer viagra sperm Vidarabine Cheapest viagra price Prevacid Viagra cialis levitra comparison Dutasteride Lisinopril Thiotepa Female spray viagra Black market phentermine Betamethasone Cialis forums What does xanax look like Loss phentermine story success weight Order xanax overnight Viagra alternative uk Diet online phentermine pill Order xanax cod Mecamylamine Eulexin Cheap hydrocodone Buy cheapest viagra Viagra xenical Phentermine with no prior prescription Xanax in urine Macrodantin Cheap phentermine with online consultation Epivir Buy phentermine epharmacist Ditropan Woman use viagra Cialis erectile dysfunction Xanax withdrawl message boards Viagra online store Atorvastatin Generic ambien Is phentermine addictive Next day delivery on phentermine Buy online viagra Ethanol Natural phentermine Avandamet Xanax long term use Diet page phentermine pill yellow 5 cheap Cheapest secure delivery cialis uk Information medical phentermine Cialis experience Phentermine no perscription Compare ionamin phentermine Viagra cialis levivia dose comparison Noroxin Effects of viagra on women Buy cheap cialis Viagra shelf life Hydroxyurea Phentermine discount no prescription Buy cheap online viagra Dog xanax Online cialis Viagra class action Viagra price Phentermine without prescription and energy pill Hydrocodone cod only Nicoumalone Cheapest viagra Cheap ambien Vicodin without prescription Phentermine prescription online Phentermine snorting Mirtazapine Quazepam Isradipine Buy generic viagra online Xanax look alike Moxifloxacin Viagra experiences Piroxicam Nicorette Free try viagra Sotalol Cash on delivery shipping of phentermine How do i stop taking phentermine Xanax prescriptions Cheapest phentermine 90 day order Niacinamide Phentermine weight loss Phentermine

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Update for Student Travel Groups: Newseum Moves to Downtown Washington D.C.

Student travel groups headed to the Washington D.C. area this fall have a brand new Newseum to look forward to on tour. That’s right it’s the Newseum — not the Museum. This fun, interactive news museum is a student favorite. The Newseum was formerly located in Arlington and it’s now moved to downtown Washington D.C. It’s on Pennsylvania Avenue, not far from the U.S. Capitol and at the location of the former Canadian Embassy.
The Newseum’s location has moved to make room for even more exhibits that trace the history of the news. The news history galleries are numerous and they concentrate on different facets of news over the course of U.S. history. Issues such as time lags in news, the information superhighway of technology, and controversial ideas covered by news are all addressed in the Newseum. Boasting of over 4,000 newspapers in the archives, this Newseum is an extensive collection from early America to the present day.

Permanent Galleries at the Newseum
Student travel groups visiting Washington D.C. do not want to miss the Newseum. Teachers and administrators will want to schedule several hours time to tour the Newseum, and see some of the excellent exhibits and theaters. The 9/11 Gallery Sponsored by Comcast is a new addition to the Newseum, and chronicles the history of the terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers that day.

15 Theaters at the Newseum
From big screen theater, to theaters devoted solely to documentary, sports or corporate America, the Newseum has it all. Students love to learn by video, and these carefully selected news shorts are sure to broaden their scope of knowledge about history and the way the news documents this.

Annenberg Theater Includes a 4 D Immersive Experience
The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Theater is the grandest of these theater venues. With graduated seating, surround sound and screens gracing either side of the auditorium, this theater is the crown jewel of the Newseum. This special theater has 3 D film and 4 D enhancements. Students can sit back and enjoy the trip through time via news media.

Sports Theater
Inside the Newseum is also a theater that focuses solely on the history of sports reporting. The Sports Theater showcases this by presenting a 25-minute documentary with highlights of sports history.

Big Screen Theater
There’s nothing quite like seeing a movie on the big screen. Student travel groups will be interested and excited to see historic news broadcasts on the big screen. The one hundred foot video wall is a visual testament to ‘big’ news that helps the viewer to relive history.

In addition to all of the theaters, there are permanent exhibits sponsored by newsmakers like the New York Times, NBC News and Bloomberg Internet, TV and Radio Gallery. There’s even a Pulitzer Prize Photographs gallery. All of these organizations bring a professional and unique perspective to the history of the news.

Just walking through the news galleries and sampling many of the films and exhibits is a way for student travelers to turn the pages back on history, and learn about our roots. News has evolved a great deal since the 17th Century, and it is now bolstered by the speed and ease of technology.

The Newseum does an excellent job of tracing the history of news making. Student travel trips to Washington D.C. need to include the Newseum on their itinerary, when they tour the Capitol district.

Plymouth, Salem, and Lowell Massachusetts: Boston Student Travel Destinations

Student travel groups destined for Boston Mass. are headed to one of the most popular student destinations in the U.S. Chosen as the 5th most popular student tour destination by Student and Youth Traveler, Boston has a great deal to offer. Educational tour groups find diversity in this urban area, and a clearer understanding the early history of Colonial settlement in New England.

Boston was a prominent seaport and a hub in the early days of the Colonies, and one of the strongholds of British rule. Many different periods of U.S. History can be explored in Boston. There are also some historic sites and points of interest just a short bus drive outside of Boston that student travel groups will not want to miss.

Student Travel Highlights of Plymouth
Just north of Boston on the coast of Massachusetts is Plymouth, the place where the Pilgrims made their first landing in the new world. Plymouth was the site of a colonial settlement and newfound freedom from the Church of England, celebrated by the Puritans.

Plimoth Plantation
Plimoth Plantation is a living history site where students can engage with costumed interpreters dressed in the garb of settlers in an English village circa 1627. Student travel groups can watch colonists in their day-to-day activities and better imagine how the early settlers lived. Educational tour groups may also visit the Wampanoag Home site. There they will gain an understanding of the way this Native American tribe that originally inhabited Plimoth lived.

Mayflower II
This reproduction of the original vessel the Pilgrims sailed on is a student favorite. Student groups can learn about maritime travel in the 17th Century, see a ship’s cabin from that era, and discover what it was like to live on board during a transatlantic journey. Student groups will meet both costumed and non-costumed interpreters on Mayflower II. Board the Mayflower II and journey back in time at this destination.

Plymouth Rock
Not far from the pier where the Mayflower II is anchored, is Plymouth Rock, the actual site of the first landing of Pilgrims from the old world, coming to the new world. A portico now surrounds the symbolic stone, and 1620, the date the Pilgrims landed, is etched on it. Student travel groups can learn more about the Pilgrims and the history of Plymouth Rock in Revolutionary times and during times of unrest.

Salem
Salem Witch Museum

The Salem Witch Museum has much to offer educational travel groups who want to learn more about the consequences of religious intolerance during the Colonial period. The Salem Witch Trials of 1692 were held here, and the book, The Crucible, was based on the accusations that eventually led to the death of the accused. The Salem area includes 10 sites near Salem Common, such as the site of the courthouse, the Meetinghouse, Cemetery, and Gallows. Student travel groups will learn much by visiting the Salem Witch Museum and touring the Salem Common area.

Lowell, Mass.
Lowell National Historic Park

Just outside of Boston Mass. is Lowell, the New England town where Jack Kerouac, the famous American Writer, grew up. Kerouac’s family was French Canadian and they migrated to Lowell to find work in the textile mills. The National Park Service has preserved historic areas of Lowell, where the textile mills became an integral part of small town American life, and working class life, especially during the post World War I era, when the industrial revolution began to really take hold in the United States. Students can see the dam and canals that used the energy from the Merrimack river, the textile mills where fabric was made, and a boardinghouse that would be typical of many worker’s dwellings of that era.

Boston is a colorful place to explore the history of Early America. Don’t limit student travel group destinations to Boston proper. There are many rich educational experiences for students just outside of Boston that can easily be integrated into a tour. Visit http://www.educationaltravelconsultants.com for even more ideas about student travel tours to Boston.